“Suzanne” by Leonard Cohen, performed by Judy Collins | 5 unclassified matherton diagrams w video embedded

The Speed Of Desire – Dave Matthews Band – Declassified tempo maps “#41” part two

According to Dave Matthews’ introduction of this song from a version recorded with Tim Reynolds at Luther College, “#41” was the “Forty-first single that was recorded by the Dave Matthews Band.” He went on to mock himself, “about as creative as the Dave Matthews band,” but went on to record one of the best versions of the many DMB is smart enough to sell from many venues – so that his band and their families and the roadies and techs and suits, they get their share. Dave and his band got into music at about he final time that music was centralized enough for one voice to be heard.




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Follow You, Follow Me | Genesis, Peter Gabriel, Gordon Lightfoot and the Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald Idea.

Follow You, Follow Me is a song Genesis wrote for their album AND THEN THERE WERE THREE.  The reason for the title was that The Five member band had lost Peter Gabriel, who, uh, did pretty well on his own – in 1974.  Peter’s family had an illness within and he had no moral choice but to leave the band. In Nicholas Nassim Taleb’s construction of a Black Swan event, Peter Gabriel’s solo career, beginning from the new sound that *popped* out of his first albums, and Peter’s creativity shows no sign of waning.

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Both Gabriels’s and Genesis’ career [American grammar] along with Phil Collins’ career meet the theory I made up with no authority at all.  It is called the The Edmund Fitzgerald rule (“TWOTEFR”). The surviving families of the Edmund Fitzgerald honored Mr. Lightfoot by asking him personally to write a song commemorating the twenty-nine lives that were lost on the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.


I have never met Gordon en persona, yet musically, I was lucky enough to hear the song in my wife’s hometown of Philadelphia.  Dr. Lightfoot played the same 12 string throughout most of his show, including TWOTEFR.  My inductive hypothesis that might be garbage  That song, in my opinion could ONLY have been written by Mr Lightfoot. I had to be (or not, I am a huge  Nassim Nicholas Taleb reader, and I know I’m on thin ice here).

Gordon’s monologue continues, “I was flattered when they came to me and asked me to write an elegy like about the incident. When I first played it, I had no idea how they react.  I was as nervous as I’d ever been but I can say that their appreciation is something that nothing in my career could ever surpass.  I am always honored to play this song.”


The Gordon Lightfoot Rule needs a quick example:  after a show in the 1980s Bob Dylan is known to have said something that is key example of TWOTEF rule – “[Sometimes after a show I think about having played a song as Like A Rolling Stone, and I say this not to brag, it just is. I think: did I actually write that song?” Meaning, simply, again, a song that the Black Swan Axiom notwithstanding, had to be. So it is not a rule as a law – it is an opinion in artistic taste. We are most careful here! I know you are if you have read this far.

A lot of women would say at Genesis concerts: “Follow You You, Follow Me” is my favorite song by this band. Men liked it because in the days that we Genesis fans brought girls to shows in the 1970s-2007, because if the women were actually happy at a show.




Sheryl Crow best bass-line groove? “My Favorite Mistake” | modern tempo probability charts copyrighted yet unclassified

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The best co-writer I ever worked with was Norman Dozier. Real name.

Norm was inside the inside the business. He had a word of wisdom in regard to *any* good piece of music, especially popular songs:

“The song has *got* to have a different, new bass-line.”

Who am I to ever question Norman? I cannot say enough about the positive influence he had on me and New York City in general. I especially thank the organist Mollie Nichols for introducing me to and arranging the playing of new music written mostly by me.

So said: the orchestration was all Norm, and the orchestration of our version of Psalm 113 squeaked in the morning service with Bach, Vaughn Williams and others I have no right to name drop. Norm helped fit our hymn in the genre of modern classical. I have total respect for the rock n roll night services and the amplifiers and drums and keyboard samples – anything that flies your plane – but not at a Sunday morning 10:30 Episcopal service – for my taste.

What do you think of this song?




Genesis’ Most Passionate Song – The Domino Suite, part One

music by Banks/Collins/Rutherford
Genesis- In The Glow -Of-The-Night, pt 1

Never on a Genesis album is Phl Collins phrasing as string as Domino Part One.
Specifically, Genesis goes full existential. After a let down from a lover, Phil sings in resilience despite pain:

Here in the glow of the night
do you *know what you have done*?!
do you *see what you’ve begun+?
could it be
the we will never be
together again?



“There’s no need to look outside,
To see or feel the rain”


I’m Only Sleeping – The Beatles – contemporary tempo maps – unclassified

Lucas Brito

loooooooooooooove this song
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Sally Wren

John’s beautiful voice that mocking fate has taken away



Harry Chapin, Suzanne Vega and other people’s pain as revealed in speed


The speed of Vega’s Luka unusually peppy for someone is actually empathetically hurting. The song reminds me of someone telling a story where the aphorism “anyone else’s pain is easy to bear” come to mind.

By contrast, Chapin is almost too sincere.

spironicus and matherton